Bingo, Bango! Redmond owes Motor City stardom to Harkness

They’re going to honor Nick Lidstrom tonight at Joe Louis Arena, a nod to Nick’s being elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame earlier this year.

A fine reason for celebration, and well-deserved, of course.

And up in the broadcast booth, one of the many who can be called the pride of Kirkland Lake, Ontario will help describe the moment.

Mickey Redmond will chime in as they fete Nick, and then proceed to call the game with Ken Daniels, complete with the requisite number of “Holy smokes” and maybe a “bingo bango” or two. But Mickey owes his three decades-long broadcast success and celebrity in Detroit to an unlikely source.

There are three words that make the old-time Red Wings fan shudder. Even the glory of four Stanley Cups won in the past 19 years can’t completely wash away the words’ stench, because of the bad memories they elicit.

Darkness with Harkness.

That trio of words represent the decade of the 1970s, when the Red Wings went off the rails because of one man’s incompetence and another man’s stubbornness.

In the summer of 1970, the Red Wings, showing some progressive thinking, went outside the box and hired a 47 year-old college coach, Ned Harkness, to take over for Sid Abel, who was going to focus his duties on being general manager, which Sid had been for the 1960s, coaching for most of the decade as well except for a brief stint by Bill Gadsby (whose tenure ended in controversy in 1969).

Harkness was wildly successful at Cornell University, but his college ways were like oil and water with the veteran NHL players on the Red Wings.

By early-January, the players revolted. Everything from the length of Garry Unger’s hair to how the team dressed on the road was monitored by Harkness, and the players hated it.

Abel was aghast. Harkness had been foistered on him by owner Bruce Norris, who was acting on the advice of another newbie—front office man Jim Bishop, whose primary experience had been in lacrosse.

Abel knew that Harkness had to go. The players knew it. The rest of the NHL knew it.

The low point came on January 2, 1971, when the Red Wings, in protest, laid down against the Toronto Maple Leafs to the tune of a 13-0 embarrassment on “Hockey Night in Canada.”

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Harkness, at his introductory press conference in the spring of 1970.

 

The Leafs scored seven times in the third period, and five times in the final ten minutes.

Abel went to Norris with Harkness’ walking papers. But Norris, siding with Bishop’s judgment, overruled Abel.

Abel, baffled, resigned in protest, temporarily ending ties with the organization after about 30 years as a player, coach and GM. Sid would return later in the decade in the broadcast booth.

With Abel gone, Norris promoted Harkness, with his 12-22-4 coaching record, to GM. Minor league coach and former Red Wing Doug Barkley was hired to be the new coach.

So what does this all have to do with Redmond?

Just a few days after being promoted to GM, Harkness made his first of many moves, trading scorer Frank Mahovlich to the Montreal Canadiens. Ironically, Abel had acquired The Big M from Toronto just three years earlier in one of the biggest blockbusters in league history. From Toronto, Abel got Mahovlich, 20 year-old Garry Unger and winger Pete Stemkowski. Going to the Leafs were Norm Ullman, Paul Henderson and Floyd Smith.

That trade, in March of 1968, rocked the NHL.

The onRedmond Montreale that Harkness made on January 13, 1971 would reverberate as well—but not as planned.

For coming over to Detroit from Montreal was a 23 year-old right winger who had a knack of putting the biscuit in the basket—Mickey Redmond.

Harkness got Redmond, Bill Collins and Guy Charron from Montreal. All for Frank Mahovlich, who would help lead the Habs to the 1971 and 1973 Stanley Cups.

Redmond, of course, went on to score 50+ goals twice as a Red Wing and he became as much a part of the fabric of Detroit as General Motors.

So much of hockey history would have been rewritten if Bruce Norris had allowed Sib Abel to fire Ned Harkness.

The players would have been happy, and played like it. Abel likely wouldn’t have made the Mahovlich trade, nor would he have traded Unger, as Harkness did about a month later. And Abel probably wouldn’t have traded Bruce MacGregor, either—as Harkness did later in the season.

Abel probably would have taken over as coach for the remainder of the year and looked for a replacement in the summer of 1971.

The Red Wings probably wouldn’t have had such a miserable decade.

And Mickey Redmond would probably have never become a Red Wing, and thus would never have found his way behind the microphone in Detroit.

Bingo-bango!

Mercurial Red Wings-Avs rivalry was sports’ best—for six years

The roots of one of the greatest rivalries in NHL history can be traced to May, 1995.

The roots started to take hold in early-December, 1995. They were firmly in the ground come the following May.

The Red Wings and the Colorado Avalanche will be playing in yet another one of those outdoor games on February 27, in Denver.

Sadly, the alumni game that will take place the day prior to the game is likely to have more juice than the real thing.

The Red Wings and the Avs were the Hatfields and the McCoys of the NHL. Heck, maybe in all of professional sports.

Their bitterness toward each other was fleeting and mercurial, however. But for about six years, nothing was a hotter ticket than a Red Wings-Avalanche game, whether it was played in Detroit or Denver.

You can have your Yankees-Red Sox. You can have your Lakers-Celtics. I’ll even give you Pistons-Celtics and Pistons-Bulls. Same with Flyers-Rangers or Canadiens-Maple Leafs.

You can have them all, but what the Red Wings and Avalanche did to each other from 1996-2002 trumps everything those teams did. For six years, it was must-see TV.

But that was a long time ago.

The Red Wings-Avs rivalry can’t truly be put up there with the greatest of all-time, because it didn’t last very long.

The Red Wings kept being good—winning another Stanley Cup in 2008—but the Avs had some playoff trouble in the years after capturing their last Cup, in 2001.

The teams met again in the post-season in 2008, but it wasn’t a competitive series whatsoever; the Red Wings swept the Avs by mostly lopsided scores.

The alumni game on February 26 will be a trip down memory lane for those who were enthralled by the drama and subplots that seemingly every Red Wings-Avalanche contest provided.

In those days, everything would spill over to the playoffs, where the teams met five times in the seven seasons between 1996-2002, with the Red Wings capturing two series, the Avs three series. Three times the squads faced off in the Western Conference Finals, with the Red Wings winning two of those.

But again—a long time ago.

The NHL is trying, I would imagine, to get some TV eyeballs on the outdoor game on February 27 because of the Red Wings-Avalanche brand name.

But today, the teams aren’t even in the same conference anymore. Most Red Wings fans likely couldn’t name three players on the Avalanche roster, without the help of the Internet.

That’s why the alumni battle will be fun. But of course, it’s not the same as when the players genuinely hated each other.

Claude Lemieux, of course, wore the biggest black hat in Detroit.

Patrick Roy’s lid was pretty large as well.

Which gets us back to the root of the issue—pun intended.

The Quebec Nordiques were a pretty good hockey club in 1995, but they were in financial trouble.

Owner Marcel Aubut tried like mad to keep the team in Quebec City, but the red ink was too deep and the Province of Quebec rejected Aubut’s proposal for a bailout.

Aubut had no choice but to sell “Le Nordique” to COMSAT Entertainment Group, which owned the NBA’s Denver Nuggets. COMSAT moved the Nordiques to Denver and dubbed them the Avalanche, prior to the start of the 1995-96 season.

Denver was a prior NHL loser, having had the Colorado Rockies from 1976-1982 before the team moved to New Jersey and became the Devils.

But the Rockies were 13 years ago in 1995, and the NHL felt comfortable giving Denver another chance—especially since the team was highly competitive.

The move from Quebec City to Denver was announced in May, 1995. So there’s your first roots of the Red Wings-Avalanche rivalry.

In early-December, the Red Wings, with what would be tremendous irony, torched Montreal Canadiens goalie Patrick Roy in an 11-1 shellacking at the old Forum. Roy surrendered all but two of the 11 goals.

Roy had battled with coach Mario Tremblay, and when Tremblay left Roy in to suffer the humiliation of the 11-1 loss to the Red Wings, the Canadiens goalie had had enough. He demanded a trade, right then and there—behind the Montreal bench. Roy sought out Canadiens President Ronald Corey, seated near the team’s bench, and announced that he’d just played his last game as a Hab.

Roy was traded forthwith—to the Colorado Avalanche.

A rivalry’s roots started to take firmer hold.

The Avalanche, for one, moved to the Red Wings’ conference because of their geographical relocation to Denver.

As fate would have it, the Red Wings would set a new all-time record for most wins in a season (62), and in the conference finals, who were waiting for them but the Colorado Avalanche—with their new goalie, Patrick Roy.

Lemieux rearranged Kris Draper’s face with a brutal, illegal hit in the Conference Finals, which the Avs won in six games.

Red Wings forward Dino Ciccarelli lamented the post-series handshake after Game 6.

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Claude Lemieux, leaving the scene of the crime in the 1996 Western Conference Finals.

“I can’t believe I shook that [expletive]’s hand,” Ciccarelli seethed of Lemieux, who had been suspended for the clinching game because of the Draper hit, and who joined his teammates on the ice in an Avs t-shirt for the handshake.

The rivalry was now on!

Back and forth the two teams went for the next six years, slugging it out on the ice—twice the goalies got into it—with each team one-upping the other. But the head that wore the rivalry’s crown lied uneasily. Neither team really dominated, or went on any long winning streak against the other.

That was, of course, part of what made Red Wings-Avs so delicious. It was like MAD Magazine’s “Spy vs. Spy” series.

But after 2002, the teams didn’t have very many memorable regular season contests, as they used to. And in that 2008 playoff series, the Avs were totally outclassed.

The Red Wings moved to the Eastern Conference in 2013, which means the two teams hardly play each other.

But for six years, we were treated to the best that pro sports rivalries can give.

There were heroes and villains, subplots and drama. Even a mental image of an Avs sweater would make a Red Wings fan seethe, and vice versa.

When the Red Wings ousted the Avs in Game 6 of the 1997 Conference Finals, it was like when the Pistons finally eliminated the Celtics in the 1988 Conference Finals after years of torment; that 1997 series victory almost meant more than winning the damn Cup—which the Red Wings hadn’t done for 42 years.

The rosters for this month’s alumni game were announced a few weeks ago and as you would expect, the names that dot them are a Who’s Who of vintage Red Wings-Avs storylines.

But there won’t be bloody battles. There won’t be black hats. There will only be the names of yesteryear on the backs of the sweaters.

There’ll be too much smiling on the ice, number one.

As for the real game on February 27 between the Red Wings and Avs of today, you can have it.

All this is, is a reminder that sometimes in sports, you can never go back.

But you have the memories, and those will have to suffice—and they will.